Can One Life Make Any Difference?

Posted: January 7, 2012 in Uncategorized

Edward Kimball was a faithful Christian who wanted to be used by God. He was not a pastor or a missionary, but he knew that every Christian is called to share the Gospel. Kimball was especially burdened for a young man named Dwight, who worked in a Chicago shoe store. Kimball finally mustered the courage to go and tell Dwight about Jesus. Much to his delight, the young man responded and have his life to Christ. Later, Dwight began a preaching ministry. He was known as D. L. Moody, who was one of the greatest evangelists in church history.
One day as Moody was preaching, a man named Frederick Meyer was listening. Meyer was already a Christian, but Moody’s preaching motivated him to enter full-time ministry. We know him as F.B. Meyer. Kimball reached Moody, and Moody reached Meyer, but the story doesn’t end there.
When Meyer was preaching, a young man named Wilbur Chapman responded and gave his life to Christ. Chapman felt called to be an evangelist. One of the young men that he took under his wing was a former professional baseball player who, also wanted to preach the gospel and did so with great success. His name was Billy Sunday.
Sunday held a crusade in Charlotte, North Carolina, where many people came to faith. The people there were so thrilled that they wanted to have another crusade. Sunday wasn’t available, so an evangelist named Mordechai Hamm Was invited to speak. While the crusade wasn’t considered as successful as the first one, a young lanky farm boy named William walked down the aisle one of the names and gave his heart to Christ. We know that young man as Billy Graham.
Kimball reached Moody, who touched Meyer, who reached Chapman, who helped Sunday, who reached the businessman in Charlotte who invited Hamm, who touched a young man named Billy Graham. You might not be a Moody, or a Sunday, or a Billy Graham, but you can certainly be an Edward Kimball.

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